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Lars Von Trier, the controversial director behind Antichrist, Nymphomaniac, and Breaking The Waves returned with another of his descents into baroque, disturbing material with one of the grossest and hardest to watch films of the year (probably the last decade). Or at least that’s what the audiences in attendance at the Cannes Film Festival would have you believe.

Met with massive walkouts, The House That Jack Built is Von Trier’s serial killer movie but one that, as the director himself put it to The Guardian “celebrates the idea that life is evil and soulless.” It’s hard to not believe why so many people would be angered over seeing it now. In the official Cannes program, a warning appears next to the film’s schedule times: “Certain scenes are likely to offend the sensitivity of the spectators.”

Check out the trailer below:

The film takes place in 1970s USA following serial killer Jack, played by Matt Dillon, and the murders that define his development in this field. Viewers experience the story from Jack’s point of view with each murder described as artwork. As the police close in, he takes more chances and also has revealing conversations about his personal condition with Verge, played by Downfall’s Bruno Ganz (remember the Hitler-Bunker meme? That was him). The House That Jack Built also stars Riley Keough, Siobhan Fallon, Sofie Gråbøl, and Uma Thurman.

The first trailer for The House That Jack Built landed online just hours before its world premiere at the 71st International Cannes Film Festival and opens with images of Dillon smashing Uma Thurman’s face in with a car jack before weeping in the rain while discussing his thoughts on art, heaven and hell. David Bowie’s “Fame” plays as he cues one victim to scream, and drags another body, wrapped in plastic, attached to his van’s bumper. It’s all pretty sickening stuff; definitely not for the faint of heart but for Von Trier, as well as those that came to the defense of the film (there were a few), this is a meditation on evil and the nature of the darkness in humanity.

The House That Jack Built

Cannes theater-goers just weren’t having it. The audiences are known for being very passionate (sometimes accused of being pretentious), prone to booing and standing ovations in equal measure, but the social media reports out of The House That Jack Built describe a sea of walkouts, groans, hisses, and a general discourse of disgust and venomous vitriol. “Von Trier has just gone too far this time,” was a sentiment being passed around by many. There is already a horde of online reactions from the South of France this morning.

We’ve collected many of them for you to check out for yourself:

Lars Von Trier was given a lifetime ban from Cannes in 2011 for comments that sympathized with Nazis during the press conference of Melancholia. The House That Jack Built was a late addition to Cannes and it played out of competition, but rumors swirled beforehand that many Cannes organizers didn’t want the film playing at the festival at all, and that Cannes President Thierry Fremaux was a huge advocate of lifting the filmmaker’s ban.

It should be said, the film received a standing ovation from those who stuck around till the end. However, Von Trier has also entered back into the public eye for more than just his new film after sexual harassment charges from Bjork were leveled at him recently. Bjork, who starred in Von Trier’s Palmes d’Or-winning film Dancer In The Dark back in 2000 accused the director of bullying her during the filming, and following those allegations, Trier’s own production company Zentropa was accused of systematic degradation and sexual harassment.

Lars Von Trier

IFC Films will debut The House That Jack Built in U.S. theaters sometime this fall.


Images: IFC

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About Mitchell Corner

view all posts

Born and raised in Toronto, Ontario of the Great White North, Mitchell has written for GEEK, Portal 13, Grizzlybomb, and The Richest. Though his obsession for film often outweighs everything else, his writing includes reviews and editorials on TV, digital media, and all things Geeky.

The House That Jack Built Is The Most Controversial Film Of The Year

Lars Von Trier returns with a serial killer movie that's described as vomitive,’ ‘torturous’; causing mass walkouts during screenings.

By Mitchell Corner | 05/15/2018 11:00 AM PT

News

Lars Von Trier, the controversial director behind Antichrist, Nymphomaniac, and Breaking The Waves returned with another of his descents into baroque, disturbing material with one of the grossest and hardest to watch films of the year (probably the last decade). Or at least that’s what the audiences in attendance at the Cannes Film Festival would have you believe.

Met with massive walkouts, The House That Jack Built is Von Trier’s serial killer movie but one that, as the director himself put it to The Guardian “celebrates the idea that life is evil and soulless.” It’s hard to not believe why so many people would be angered over seeing it now. In the official Cannes program, a warning appears next to the film’s schedule times: “Certain scenes are likely to offend the sensitivity of the spectators.”

Check out the trailer below:

The film takes place in 1970s USA following serial killer Jack, played by Matt Dillon, and the murders that define his development in this field. Viewers experience the story from Jack’s point of view with each murder described as artwork. As the police close in, he takes more chances and also has revealing conversations about his personal condition with Verge, played by Downfall’s Bruno Ganz (remember the Hitler-Bunker meme? That was him). The House That Jack Built also stars Riley Keough, Siobhan Fallon, Sofie Gråbøl, and Uma Thurman.

The first trailer for The House That Jack Built landed online just hours before its world premiere at the 71st International Cannes Film Festival and opens with images of Dillon smashing Uma Thurman’s face in with a car jack before weeping in the rain while discussing his thoughts on art, heaven and hell. David Bowie’s “Fame” plays as he cues one victim to scream, and drags another body, wrapped in plastic, attached to his van’s bumper. It’s all pretty sickening stuff; definitely not for the faint of heart but for Von Trier, as well as those that came to the defense of the film (there were a few), this is a meditation on evil and the nature of the darkness in humanity.

The House That Jack Built

Cannes theater-goers just weren’t having it. The audiences are known for being very passionate (sometimes accused of being pretentious), prone to booing and standing ovations in equal measure, but the social media reports out of The House That Jack Built describe a sea of walkouts, groans, hisses, and a general discourse of disgust and venomous vitriol. “Von Trier has just gone too far this time,” was a sentiment being passed around by many. There is already a horde of online reactions from the South of France this morning.

We’ve collected many of them for you to check out for yourself:

Lars Von Trier was given a lifetime ban from Cannes in 2011 for comments that sympathized with Nazis during the press conference of Melancholia. The House That Jack Built was a late addition to Cannes and it played out of competition, but rumors swirled beforehand that many Cannes organizers didn’t want the film playing at the festival at all, and that Cannes President Thierry Fremaux was a huge advocate of lifting the filmmaker’s ban.

It should be said, the film received a standing ovation from those who stuck around till the end. However, Von Trier has also entered back into the public eye for more than just his new film after sexual harassment charges from Bjork were leveled at him recently. Bjork, who starred in Von Trier’s Palmes d’Or-winning film Dancer In The Dark back in 2000 accused the director of bullying her during the filming, and following those allegations, Trier’s own production company Zentropa was accused of systematic degradation and sexual harassment.

Lars Von Trier

IFC Films will debut The House That Jack Built in U.S. theaters sometime this fall.


Images: IFC

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



About Mitchell Corner

view all posts

Born and raised in Toronto, Ontario of the Great White North, Mitchell has written for GEEK, Portal 13, Grizzlybomb, and The Richest. Though his obsession for film often outweighs everything else, his writing includes reviews and editorials on TV, digital media, and all things Geeky.